All Get Out

All Get Out

Ratboys, Wild Pink

Tue, August 22, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:45 pm

$12.00

This event is 21 and over

All Get Out
All Get Out
The road is family – the disciplining father, the nurturing mother; exist as shadows at each stop to any band betrothed to relentless touring without a safety net. With miles behind and miles ahead, life in a van will change a band; and All Get Out are no exception. From the wasted days stranded, to the desolate moments of doubt, to the nights where immortality stretches through bended notes, two-hundred and fifty shows a year has shaped the band known for their attitude and angst on display through high woven volume into a refined framework fusing gambled moments and glossy catchiness.

"We sound like we've been on tour for three years. We've been smoking and driving, and we don't smell too good," Nathan Hussey, singer and guitarist, defining the coming of age sound on their full-length debut, The Season.

In 2007 the foursome from Charleston, SC found themselves with two EPs, stumbling into regular weekend tours of the South. Soon three days became a month and a month became six. A play-anywhere-for-anyone ethic kept All Get Out on tour for three years. A loyal fan base that has been equally enamored and entertained with their big ditch, bigger valley sound has grown with them, anticipating when the band would enter the studio again.

Acting as a centerpiece to an album with running themes, the title track for The Season puts all the moments that have shaped the members square into the light. "While touring is fun and a dream, there were times where all of us wanted a wall to punch and cry and wished we were home, or had a home." Hussey explains. Writing in the moment, truly unfiltered, each verse displays specific moments of disarray the band found themselves in: broken friendships, fights, and empty wallets. In the end The Season is about moving past it all so you can keep on driving.

Just as All Get Out accidentally ended up spending the formidable part of their '20s counting mile markers, so did The Season unintentionally transform itself into a pop record when the band began tracking with producer Matt Malpass (Lydia, Copeland). Still visceral and soul-bearing as before, The Season stretches All Get Out into the frequencies beyond reactionary abrasions.

Rather than discard older material that dated back to 2007, when a much younger All Get Out wore relationship dirt all over each melody, the songs were kept for nostalgia, giving everyone a chance to hear how the band grew. Songs like My Friends, Son of Mine, Don't Let Me Go and Girl Gun display an innocence, but the rest of the album shows a band aware that the horizon holds more than can be comprehended. Even Hussey has taken himself out as the protagonist of each song, changing his voice into a character that meanders in, saying "hello", as the much bigger story unfolds.

"It's a book on the history of our band," Hussey says of album. "Now we start another Season."
Ratboys
Ratboys
Born out of fierce friendship and a mutual affection for melody, Chicago’s Ratboys – anchored by the partnership of Julia Steiner and Dave Sagan – aims to ‘write songs that tell stories and honor the intimacy of memory,’ according to Steiner.

GN, the group’s second full-length album via Topshelf Records, offers a bevy of tales, laments and triumphs, which recount near-tragedies by the train tracks, crippling episodes of loneliness, remembrances of a deceased family pet with freezer burn, and on and on. The songs shift and breathe as worlds all their own, tied together by the group’s self-proclaimed ‘post-country’ sound, which combines moments of distortion and a DIY aesthetic with a devotion to simple songwriting and ties to the Americana sounds of years past.

Drawing influence from the down-to-earth sincerity of late-90s Sheryl Crow and the confessional confidence of Kim Deal and Jenny Lewis, the songs on GN (aka ‘goodnight’) “largely detail experiences of saying goodbye, finding your way home, and then figuring out what the hell to do once you’re back,” says Steiner. The songs chosen to close both sides of the record – the slow-burning ‘Crying About the Planets’ and quizzical ‘Peter the Wild Boy’ – unpack the respective journeys of two real people who were quite literally lost and found. ‘’Crying’ tells the survival story of Antarctic explorer Douglas Mawson from a first-person perspective, and ‘Peter’ reflects on the life of a feral child in Germany who was eventually adopted by the King of England,’ according to Steiner. ‘Writing as and about these people is the best way I can attempt to empathize with them and really just wrap my mind around these bits of history that otherwise might not get talked about. And it helps me understand my own experiences a little bit better,’ she says.

Certain personal stories – the tour adventures recapped in ‘GM,’ the struggle to learn to show affection as divulged in ‘Molly’ – find Ratboys just as eagerly exploring subject matter that comes from within, and then illustrating the highs and lows with soaring hooks and plaintive ones. Even in the moments that lie somewhere between bliss and misery, a tension persists between Steiner’s sweet vocal delivery and Sagan’s physical, almost-off-the-hinges guitar playing that lends each song a deeper sense of color and movement.


Steiner and Sagan felt the impulse to make music together from the get-go – they first met as university students, quickly put out an EP together, and started performing as an acoustic two-piece in dorm rooms and backyards. During the next few years, the friends traveled separately, eventually reunited, and recorded what would become the first Ratboys record, AOID, which the folks at GoldFlakePaint describe as ‘a gleaming, joyous, raucous display of melodic indie-rock.’

After a year and a half of touring the US and Europe as a plugged-in full band (featuring the additions of drums, bass, and trumpet), the members of Ratboys returned to Chicago and holed up at Atlas Studios for two weeks to record with engineer Mikey Crotty (who had previously worked with the group on the songs 'Not Again' and 'Light Pollution'). ‘This time around, we were lucky enough to feature the talents of friends who play the pedal steel, accordion, cello and violin to give the songs an extra something,’ says Steiner. ‘Dave finally got to show off his ridiculous skills on the pocket piano, and the whole thing felt like one big loving experiment.’

Those good times and long days yielded the 10 songs that make up GN, which Evan Hall of Pinegrove calls ‘a delectable chapter in the Ratboys story.’
Wild Pink
Wild Pink
Wild Pink released their debut EP, Good Life, in the Summer of 2015. It was a brief but memorable introduction to the band's brand of introspective indie pop/rock. After numerous tours in support of Good Life the band hunkered down with Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz, Kindling, Sweet John Bloom) to record new songs. What grew from those sessions was actually two new releases. First and foremost, the band's debut LP, slated for release in early 2017 on Tiny Engines. But also, 4 Songs, a supplemental EP out this October, that serves to bridge the gap between releases as the band grows more expansive in their sound and ambitious in their songwriting.

Wild Pink are one of those wonderfully rare bands that sounds instantly familiar upon first listen. Yet trying to draw parallels to their influences or similar bands proves to be incredibly difficult. That remains the same as Wild Pink continue to chart their own unique course. These new songs move at their own intentional pace while the band fleshes their arrangements out further. Yet the songs never suffer, only growing more dynamic and more propulsive with this increased nuance. Wild Pink doesn't lose the warm intimacy that made the band special, it's only enhanced to a greater degree here. These are deeply personal songs about freedom, or lack thereof, about growing up and leaving your youth behind yet still clinging to those sacred scars that we hold dear. Often exercising a stream of conscious lyrical style, Wild Pink has a remarkable way of transporting you to those moments in time where the smallest detail remains etched into your being. There is a sincerity that echoes throughout these songs that is intoxicating and speaks to what makes the band so special. Wild Pink choose the road less traveled and it has served them well.
Venue Information:
Kung Fu Necktie
1250 N Front Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19122
http://kungfunecktie.com/

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